The book thieves : the Nazi looting of Europe's libraries and the race to return a literary inheritance /

While the Nazi party was being condemned by much of the world for burning books, they were already hard at work perpetrating an even greater literary crime. Through new research that included records saved by the Monuments Men themselves -- Anders Rydell tells the untold story of Nazi book theft, as...

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Main Author: Rydell, Anders, 1982- (Author)
Other Authors: Koch, Henning, 1962- (Translator)
Format: Book
Language:English
Swedish
Published: New York, New York : Viking, [2017]
Subjects:
http://worldcat.org/oclc/970663324:http://worldcat.org/oclc/970663324 WorldCat Link
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Main Author:Rydell, Anders, 1982- author.
Uniform Title:Boktjuvarna. English
Summary:While the Nazi party was being condemned by much of the world for burning books, they were already hard at work perpetrating an even greater literary crime. Through new research that included records saved by the Monuments Men themselves -- Anders Rydell tells the untold story of Nazi book theft, as he himself joins the effort to return the stolen books. When the Nazi soldiers ransacked Europe's libraries and bookshops, large and small, the books they stole were not burned. Instead, the Nazis began to compile a library of their own that they could use to wage an intellectual war on literature and history. In this secret war, the libraries of Jews, Communists, Liberal politicians, LGBT activists, Catholics, Freemasons, and many other opposition groups were appropriated for Nazi research, and used as an intellectual weapon against their owners. But when the war was over, most of the books were never returned. Instead many found their way into the public library system, where they remain to this day. Now, Rydell finds himself entrusted with one of these stolen volumes, setting out to return it to its rightful owner. It was passed to him by the small team of heroic librarians who have begun the monumental task of combing through Berlin's public libraries to identify the looted books and reunite them with the families of their original owners. For those who lost relatives in the Holocaust, these books are often the only remaining possession of their relatives they have ever held. And as Rydell travels to return the volume he was given, he shows just how much a single book can mean to those who own it.

By turns fascinating, harrowing, yet ultimately uplifting, this is the story of the Nazis' systematic pillaging of Europe's libraries, and the heroic efforts of the few librarians now working to return the stolen books to their owners.In the wake of one of History's most expansive cultural crimes, Anders Rydell shows just how much a single book can mean to those who own it.

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Language Notes:Translated from the Swedish.
General Notes:Originally published: Stockholm : Norstedts, 2015 under the title Boktjuvarna : jakten på de försvunna biblioteken.
Physical Description:xiii, 352 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 317-336) and index.
ISBN:9780735221222 (hardcover)
Author Notes:

Anders Rydell is a journalist, editor, and author of nonfiction. As the Head of Culture at a major Swedish media group, Rydell directs the coverage of arts and culture in 14 newspapers. His two books on the Nazis, The Book Theives and aThe Looters ,ahave been translated into 16 languages. The Book Thievesa is his first work published in English. a Henning Koch awas born in Sweden but has spent most of his life in England, Spain, and Sardinia. Most recently he translateda A Man Called Ove aby Fredrik Backman. He has also written a short story collection, Love Doesn't Work, and a novel, The Maggot People.

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