Summary:

Alice Walker is one of the most influential and controversial figures in twentieth-century American literature. This collection of essays represents a dispassionate scholarly effort to comprehend the essential elements of her prolific imagination, which celebrates women by chronicling their troubled journey from silence to self-expression and from pain to resistance. The essays fall largely into three main groups, focusing on Walker's most famous and controversial novel, The Color Purple , on her poetry, which has for too long met with critical neglect, and on her ecofeminist novel, The Temple of My Familiar .

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Physical Description:x, 226 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (p. [213]-218) and index.
ISBN:0313300127 (alk. paper)
Author Notes:

IKENNA DIEKE is Associate Professor of African American Studies at the University of Arizona. He is the author of The Primordial Image: African, Afro-American, and Caribbean Mythopoetic Text (1993) and of several articles in scholarly journals such as African American Review and The New Review .


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