William F. Buckley Jr.

Buckley at the second inauguration of US President [[Ronald Reagan]] in 1985 William Frank Buckley Jr. (born William Francis Buckley; November 24, 1925 – February 27, 2008) was an American public intellectual and conservative author and commentator. In 1955, Buckley founded ''National Review'', a magazine that stimulated the conservative movement in the late-20th century United States. Buckley hosted 1,429 episodes of the public affairs television show ''Firing Line'' (1966–1999), the longest-running public affairs show in television history with a single host, where he became known for his transatlantic accent and overpowering vocabulary.

Buckley wrote ''God and Man at Yale'' (1951) and more than fifty other books on diverse topics, including writing, speaking, history, politics, and sailing. Buckley's works include a series of novels featuring fictitious CIA agent Blackford Oakes. He also penned a nationally syndicated newspaper column.

Buckley referred to himself as either a libertarian or conservative. George H. Nash, a historian of the modern American conservative movement, said Buckley was "arguably the most important public intellectual in the United States in the past half century. For an entire generation, he was the preeminent voice of American conservatism and its first great ecumenical figure." Buckley's primary contribution to politics was a fusion of traditionalist conservatism and classical liberalism; that fusion laid the groundwork for a rightward shift in the Republican Party, as exemplified by Barry Goldwater and Ronald Reagan. Provided by Wikipedia
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by Buckley, William F. 1925-
Published 1973
Book
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by Buckley, William F. 1925-
Published 1968
Book
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by Buckley, William F. 1925-2008.
Published 2008
Book
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Other Authors: '; ...Buckley, William F. 1925-...
Journal / Magazine Microform
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