Hezekiah in history and tradition

This study draws upon the biblical books of Kings, First Isaiah and Chronicles, in conjunction with Assyrian records and ancient Near Eastern archaeology, in order to provide an updated historical reconstruction of the influential Judean monarch Hezekiah.

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Main Author: Young, Robb Andrew.
Corporate Authors: ebrary, Inc.
ProQuest (Firm)
Format: Book Electronic
Language:English
Published:Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2012.
Series:Supplements to Vetus Testamentum ; v. 155.
ebrary Academic religion & philosophy
Academic complete, religion & philosophy
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Online Access:http://site.ebrary.com/lib/jkmlibrary/detail.action?docID=10562449 Access restricted to individuals currently affiliated with the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and McCormick Theological Seminary
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Table of Contents:
  • Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Introduction; Part One Hezekiah via Extra-Biblical Material; Chapter One Regnal Years and Lineage; 1.1. The Regnal Years of Hezekiah; 1.1.1. Overview; 1.1.2. The Date of the Fall of Samaria; 1.1.3. The Date of the Fall of Jerusalem; 1.1.4. Regnal Years of the Latter Kings of Judah; 1.2. The Lineage of Hezekiah; 1.2.1. Relationship to Ahaz; 1.2.2. Relationship to Ataliah; 1.3. Conclusion; Chapter Two The Kingdom of Judah; 2.1. Assyrian Relations; 2.2. The Urbanization of Jerusalem; 2.3. The Siloam Tunnel; 2.4. The LMLK Seals; 2.5. Conclusion. Chapter Three Sennacherib's Third Campaign3.1. Archaeological Evidence; 3.2. The Number of Assyrian Campaigns; 3.3. Taharqo; 3.4. Historical Reconstruction; 3.5. Conclusion; Part Two Hezekiah in the Book of Kings and First Isaiah; Chapter Four The Religious Reform; 4.1. Archaeological Evidence; 4.1.1. Arad; 4.1.2. Beer-sheba; 4.1.3. Lachish; 4.2. Biblical Evidence; 4.2.1. The Report in 2 Kgs 18:4; 4.2.2. The Report in 2 Kgs 18:22; 4.3. The Social Setting of the Reform; 4.4. Conclusion; Chapter Five The Relationship between 2 Kgs 18:13-20:19 and Isa 36-39; 5.1. Relative Priority of the Texts. 5.1.1. Annalistic Account A (2 Kgs 18:13-16)5.1.2. Prophetic Account B (2 Kgs 18:17-19:37 / Isa 36-37); 5.1.3. Hezekiah and Isaiah (2 Kgs 20 / Isa 38-39); 5.2. Editing of the Texts; 5.2.1. Source Division; 5.2.2. Literary Analysis; 5.2.3. The Secondary Nature of "The Fourteenth Year"; 5.3. Conclusion; Chapter Six The Mesianic Oracles in First Isaiah; 6.1. Isa 8:23-9:6; 6.1.1. Overview; 6.1.2. Literary Extent and Structure; 6.1.3. Tense/Aspect Analysis; 6.1.4. Translation; 6.1.5. Function of Isa 9:5-6; 6.1.6. Literary and Historical Context; 6.2. Isa 11:1-9; 6.2.1. Overview. 6.2.2. Literary Extent6.2.3. The Significance of the "Shoot"; 6.2.4. Literary and Historical Context; 6.3. Isa 7 and the Sign of Immanuel; 6.3.1. Overview; 6.3.2. The Identity of Immanuel; 6.4. Conclusion; Part Three Hezekiah in Chronicles; Chapter Seven The Historical Reliability of 2 Chr 29-30; 7.1. The Rededication of the Temple (2 Chr 29); 7.1.1. Authorship; 7.1.2. Material; 7.2. The Passover (2 Chr 30); 7.2.1. Summary Statement; 7.2.2. Other Historical Objections; 7.2.3. Correspondence to Josiah's Passover and Deuteronomy; 7.2.4. Source Material; 7.2.5. The Second Month; 7.3. Conclusion. Chapter Eight The Historical Reliability of 2 Chr 31-328.1. The Reform and the Portions (2 Chr 31); 8.1.1. The Reform; 8.1.2. Distribution of the Portions; 8.1.3. Historical Analysis of the Portions; 8.2. The Invasion of Sennacherib (2 Chr 32); 8.2.1. Hezekiah's Defensive Measures (vv 3-6); 8.2.2. Hezekiah's Achievements (vv 27-30); 8.3. Conclusion; Chapter Nine Hezekiah as a Second David/Solomon; 9.1. The Dynastic Promises to David and Solomon; 9.1.1. Conditional and Unconditional Material; 9.1.2. The Depiction of Solomon; 9.2. The Pro-Solomonic Source of Chronicles.