The satires /

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Main Author: Juvenal.
Other Authors: Rudd, Niall
Format: Book
Language:English
Published:Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1991.
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Main Author:Juvenal.
Uniform Title:Works. English. 1991
Summary:

* A new translation combining textual accuracy with colourful poetryJuvenal, whose work dates from the early second century AD, is commonly considered the greatest of Roman satirical poets. His sixteen satires are all concerned with contemporary Roman society. They are notable for their bitter, ironical humour, power of invective, grim epigrams, sympathy with thepoor, and a narrow pessimism. Juvenal's influence was great among English satirists, notably Samuel Johnson.In this new translation of the Satires, Professor Rudd combines textual accuracy with colourful poetry. His verse vividly conveys Juvenal's gift for evoking a wealth of imagery with a few economical phrases.The introduction and notes provided by Dr Barr outline the background to the Satires and explain contemporary allusions. This translation should therefore be fully accessible to the modern reader.

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Physical Description:xxxviii, 250 p. ; 23 cm.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:0198147562
Author Notes:

The 16 Satires (c.110--127) of Juvenal, which contain a vivid picture of contemporary Rome under the Empire, have seldom been equaled as biting diatribes. The satire was the only literary form that the Romans did not copy from the Greeks. Horace merely used it for humorous comment on human folly. Juvenal's invectives in powerful hexameters, exact and epigrammatic, were aimed at lax and luxurious society, tyranny (Domitian's), criminal excesses, and the immorality of women. Juvenal was so sparing of autobiographical detail that we know very little of his life. He was desperately poor at one time and may have been an important magistrate at another.

His influence was great in the Middle Ages; in the seventeenth century he was well translated by Dryden, and in the eighteenth century he was paraphrased by Johnson in his London and The Vanity of Human Wishes. He inspired in Swift the same savage bitterness.

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