Adventures of Huckleberry Finn : a case study in critical controversy /

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Main Author: Twain, Mark, 1835-1910.
Other Authors: Phelan, James, 1951-
Graff, Gerald.
Format: Book
Language:English
Published:Boston : Bedford Books of St. Martin's Press, c1995.
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Main Author:Twain, Mark, 1835-1910.
Summary:

Hilariously picaresque, epic in scope, alive with the poetry and vigor of the American people, Mark Twain's story about a young boy and his journey down the Mississippi was the first great novel to speak in a truly American voice. Influencing subsequent generations of writers -- from Sherwood Anderson to Twain's fellow Missourian, T.S. Eliot, from Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner to J.D. Salinger -- Huckleberry Finn, like the river which flows through its pages, is one of the great sources which nourished and still nourishes the literature of America.

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Physical Description:viii, 551 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN:0312122616 (hardcover)
0312112254 (pbk.)
Author Notes:

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled throughout the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, Gilded Age in 1873, which was co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi, and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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