The used world : a novel /

Hazel Hunnicut is the proprietor of Hazel Hunnicut's Used World Emporium, the station at the end of the line for myriad antiques and junk in Jonah, Ind. With her passel of cats and distaste for convention, Hazel is eccentric but grudgingly beloved by her two employees: Claudia, a tall and lonel...

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Main Author: Kimmel, Haven, 1965-
Format: Book
Language:English
Published:New York : Free Press, ©2007.
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Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

Kimmel (Something Rising (Light and Swift); A Girl Named Zippy) returns to rural Indiana in her expansive third novel. Hazel Hunnicut is the proprietor of Hazel Hunnicut's Used World Emporium, "the station at the end of the line" for myriad antiques and junk in Jonah, Ind. With her passel of cats and distaste for convention, Hazel is eccentric but grudgingly beloved by her two employees: Claudia, a tall and lonely woman ostracized for her androgynous appearance, and Rebekah, who is still recovering from an oppressive Pentecostal upbringing. With a nudge from Hazel and the appearance of an abandoned infant (whose junkie mother, a friend of Hazel's junkie sister, is dead), the two women form a relationship, providing momentum as an unlikely family takes shape and hidden connections between the characters are revealed. The story has many satisfying layers, but melding them requires Kimmel to jump around in time, sometimes to confusing results (among the pasts visited are Rebekah's childhood; Hazel's upbringing and the backstory on her relationship with the locals; and dreamlike visions of a long-ago romance between a black groundskeeper and a white judge's daughter). It's an intriguing puzzle box of a novel with a few edges left unsanded. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by Kirkus Book Review

Kimmel returns to the rural, small-town Indiana landscape of her memoirs (She Got Up Off the Couch, 2006, etc.) and her first novel (The Solace of Leaving Early, 2002), as well as to some favorite themes--beloved mothers; absent fathers; and what it means to be a Christian today. Hazel, whose tough old hide conceals a soft heart, owns the eponymous second-hand store. There she employs Claudia, a mannishly big, desperately lonely woman in her 40s, and petite, 20-something Rebekah. Claudia has always avoided venturing beyond the bosom of her family and is still mourning her mother's death three years ago when Hazel manipulates her into caring for an abandoned baby. After her own adored mother's death, Rebekah rejected the strict Christian sect within which she was raised but has continued to live at home with her dictatorial father Vernon. When Rebekah's boyfriend gets her pregnant and disappears, Vernon kicks Rebekah out. Hazel convinces Rebekah to go to Claudia's for refuge. Suddenly Claudia finds herself with both a baby and a young woman to love. Interspersed with the ups and downs of Claudia and Rebekah's relationship as they form a makeshift family is the story of Hazel's adolescence during the 1960s and her past connection to Vernon, the novel's obvious villain. Hazel's best friend Finney, whom Hazel loved, perhaps more than platonically, became involved with a married man--Vernon. Jim, a young man who loved Hazel, married Finney to protect her when she became pregnant with Vernon's child. Vernon's violent attempt to take Finney's infant for his wife to adopt caused Finney's death, Jim's brain damage and the stillbirth of a boy who would have been Rebekah's brother. As if to counter Vernon's narrow-minded brand of Christianity, Kimmel inserts conversation with Claudia's enlightened Christian minister Amos, whose relationship with Claudia remains a red herring. Although Kimmel can write with real charm, the characters feel manufactured in this overly schematic plot. Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

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