Being and time : a translation of Sein und Zeit /

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Main Author: Heidegger, Martin, 1889-1976.
Other Authors: Stambaugh, Joan, 1932-
Format: Book
Language:English
Published:Albany, NY : State University of New York Press, c1996.
Series:SUNY series in contemporary continental philosophy
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Table of Contents:
  • Translator's Preface
  • Author's Preface to the Seventh German Edition
  • [Exergue]
  • Introduction
  • The Exposition of the Question of the Meaning of Being
  • I. The Necessity, Structure, and Priority of the Question of Being
  • 1. The Necessity of an Explicit Retrieve of the Question of Being
  • 2. The Formal Structure of the Question of Being
  • 3. The Ontological Priority of the Question of Being
  • 4. The Ontic Priority of the Question of Being
  • II. The Double Task in Working Out the Question of Being: The Method of the Investigation and Its Outline
  • 5. The Ontological Analysis of Da-sein as the Exposure of the Horizon for an Interpretation of the Meaning of Being in General
  • 6. The Task of a Destructuring of the History of Ontology
  • 7. The Phenomenological Methos of the Investigation
  • a. The Concept of Phenomenon
  • b. The Concept of Logos
  • c. The Preliminary Concept of Phenomenology
  • 8. The Outline of the Treatise
  • Part 1. The Interpretation of Da-sein in Terms of Temporality and the Explication of Time as the Transcendental Horizon of the Question of Being
  • Division 1. The Preparatory Fundamental Analysis of Da-sein
  • I. The Exposition of the Task of a Preparatory Analysis of Da-sein
  • 9. The Theme of the Analytic of Da-sein
  • 10. How the Analytic of Da-sein is to be Distinguished from Anthropology, Psychology, and Biology
  • 11. The Existential Analytic and the Interpretation of Primitive Da-sein: The Difficulties in Securing a "Natural Concept of the World"
  • II. Being-in-the-World in General as the Fundamental Constitution of Da-sein
  • 12. A Preliminary Sketch of Being-in-the-World in Terms of the Orientation toward Being-in as Such
  • 13. The Exemplification of Being-in in a Founded Mode: Knowing the World
  • III. The Worldliness of the World
  • 14. The Idea of the Worldliness of the World in General
  • A. Analysis of Environmentality and Worldliness in General
  • 15. The Being of Beings Encountered in the Surrounding World
  • 16. The Worldly Character of the Surrounding World Making Itself Known in Innerworldly Beings
  • 17. Reference and Signs
  • 18. Relevance and Significance: The Worldliness of the World
  • B. Contrast between Our Analysis of Worldiness and Descartes' Interpretation of the World
  • 19. The Determination of the "World" as Res Extensa
  • 20. The Fundaments of the Ontological Definition of the "World"
  • 21. Hermeneutical Discussion of the Cartesian Ontology of the "World"
  • C. The Aroundness of the Surrounding World and the Spatiality of Da-sein
  • 22. The Spatiality of Innerworldly Things at Hand
  • 23. The Spatiality of Being-in-the-World
  • 24. The Spatiality of Da-sein and Space
  • IV. Being-in-the-World as Being-with and Being a Self: The "They"
  • 25. The Approach to the Existential Question of the Who of Da-sein
  • 26. The Mitda-sein of the Others and Everyday Being-with
  • 27. Everyday Being One's Self and the They
  • V. Being-in as Such
  • 28. The Task of a Thematic Analysis of Being-in
  • A. The Existential Constitution of the There
  • 29. Da-sein as Attunement
  • 30. Fear as a Mode of Attunement
  • 31. Da-sein as Understanding
  • 32. Understanding and Interpretation
  • 33. Statement as a Derivative Mode of Interpretation
  • 34. Da-sein and Discourse: Language
  • B. The Everyday Being of the There and the Falling Prey of Da-sein
  • 35. Idle Talk
  • 36. Curiosity
  • 37. Ambiguity
  • 38. Falling Prey and Thrownness
  • VI. Care as the Being of Da-sein
  • 39. The Question of the Primordial Totality
  • 40. The Fundamental Attunement of the Angst as an Eminent Disclosedness of Da-sein
  • 41. The Being of Da-sein as Care
  • 42. Condirmation of the Existential Interpretation of Da-sein
  • 43. Da-sein, Worldliness, and Reality
  • a. Reality as a Problem of Being and the Demonstrability of the "External World"
  • b. Reality as an Ontological Problem
  • c. Reality and Care
  • 44. Da-sein, Disclosedness, and Truth
  • a. The Traditional Concept of Truth and Its Ontological Foundations
  • b. The Primordial Phenomenon of Truth and the Derivative Character of the Traditional Concept of Truth
  • c. The Kind of Being of Truth and the Presupposition of Truth
  • Division 2. Da-sein and Temporality
  • 45. The Result of the Preparatory Fundamental Analysis of Da-sein and the Task of a Primordial, Existential Interpretation of This Being
  • I. The Possible Being-a-Whole of Da-sein and Being-toward-Death
  • 46. The Seeming Impossibility of Ontologically Grasping and Determining Da-sein as a Whole
  • 47. The Possibility of Experiencing the Death of Others and the Possibility of Grasping Da-sein as a Whole
  • 48. What is Outstanding, End, and Totality
  • 49. How the Existential Analysis of Death Differs from Other Possible Interpretations of This Phenomenon
  • 50. A Preliminary Sketch of the Existential and Ontological Structure of Death
  • 51. Being-toward-Death and the Everydayness of Da-sein
  • 52. Everyday Being-toward-Death and the Complete Existential Concept of Death
  • 53. Existential Project of an Authentic Being-toward-Death
  • II. The Attestation of Da-sein of an Authentic Potentiality-of-Being, and Resoluteness
  • 54. The Problem of the Attestation of an Authentic Existentiell Possibility
  • 55. The Existential and Ontological Foundations of Conscience
  • 56. The Character of Conscience as a Call
  • 57. Conscience as the Call of Care
  • 58. Understanding the Summons, and Guilt
  • 59. The Existential Interpretation of Conscience and the Vulgar Interpretation of Conscience
  • 60. The Existential Structure of the Authentic Potentiality-of-Being Attested in Conscience
  • III. The Authentic Potentiality-for-Being-a-Whole of Da-sein, and Temporality as the Ontological Meaning of Care
  • 61. Preliminary Sketch of the Methoodical Step from Outling the Authentic Being-a-Whole of Da-sein to the Phenomenal Exposition of Temporality
  • 62. The Existenielly Authentic Potentiality-for-Being-a-Whole of Da-sein as Anticipatory Resoluteness
  • 63. The Hermeneutical Situation at Which We Have Arrived for Interpreting the Meaning of Being of Care, and the Methodical Character of the Existential Analytic in General
  • 64. Care and Selfhood
  • 65. Temporality as the Ontological Meaning of Care
  • 66. The Temporality of Da-sein and the Tasks Arising from It of a More Primordial Retrieve of the Existential Analysis
  • IV. Temporality and Everydayness
  • 67. The Basic Content of the Existential Constitution of Da-sein, and the Preliminary Sketch of Its Temporal Interpretation
  • 68. The Temporality of Disclosedness in General
  • a. The Temporality of Understanding
  • b. The Temporality of Attunement
  • c. The Temporality of Falling Prey
  • d. The Temporality of Discourse
  • 69. The Temporality of Being-in-the-World and the Problem of the Transcendence of the World
  • a. The Temporality of Circumspect Taking Care
  • b. The Temporal Meaning of the Way in which Circumspect Taking Care Becomes Modified into the Theoretical Discovery of Things Objectively Present in the World
  • c. The Temporal Problem of the Transcendence of the World
  • 70. The Temporality of the Spatiality Characteristic of Da-sein
  • 71. The Temporal Meaning of the Everydayness of Da-sein
  • V. Temporality and Historicity
  • 72. Existential and Ontological Exposition of the Problem of History
  • 73. The Vulgar Understanding of History and the Occurence of Da-sein
  • 74. The Essential Constitution of Historicity
  • 75. The Historicity of Da-sein and World History
  • 76. The Existential Origin of Historiography from Historicity of Da-sein
  • 77. The Connectin of the Foregoing Exposition of the Problem of Historicity with Investigations of Dilthey and the Ideas of Count Yorck
  • VI. Temporality and Within-Timeness as the Origin of the Vulgar Concept of Time
  • 78. The Incompleteness of the Foregoing Temporal Analysis of Da-sein
  • 79. The Temporality of Da-sein and Taking Care of Time
  • 80. Time Taken Care of and Within-Timeness
  • 81. Within-Timeness and the Genesis of the Vulgar Concept of Time
  • 82. The Contrast of the Existential and Ontological Connection of Temporality, Da-sein, and World Time with Hegel's Interpretation of the Relationship between Time and Spirit
  • a. Hegel's Concept of Time
  • b. Hegel's Interpretation of the Connection between Time and Spirit
  • 83. The Existential and Temporal Analytic of Da-sein and the Question of Fundamental Ontology as to the Meaning of Being in General
  • Notes
  • Lexicon

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