Afghanistan, Iraq and post-conflict governance : Damoclean democracy? /

Much has been written about democratizing Afghanistan and Iraq, yet a clear-cut, theoretically-enriching, and empirically thick comparative analysis remains overdue for societies as divided as these two. To partly fill in the vacuum, this book utilizes various theories and stages of international ne...

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Other Authors: Hussain, A. Imtiaz, 1953-
Format: Book Electronic
Language:English
Published:Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2010.
Series:International studies in sociology and social anthropology ; v. 113.
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Online Access:EBSCOhost - Click to view - Access for Lincoln College students, faculty, and staff only
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Summary:Much has been written about democratizing Afghanistan and Iraq, yet a clear-cut, theoretically-enriching, and empirically thick comparative analysis remains overdue for societies as divided as these two. To partly fill in the vacuum, this book utilizes various theories and stages of international negotiations (which catalyzed democratization in both cases) in interpreting both cases, while also distinguishing between endogenous and exogenous democratization forces. How electoral democracy came about in both cases is traced from the negotiating table through at least 4 stages and 6 chapters.

A comparative study is made of how conflict-terminating negotiations led to maiden democratic elections in Afghanistan and Iraq, pointing various thresholds out through specific chapters, invoking negotiations theories/stages to deepen interpretations, and prospecting the Bush Doctrine's future mileage in democratizing the Middle East.

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Physical Description:1 online resource (xiv, 308 pages) : illustrations.
Digital Characteristics:data file
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 279-293) and index.
ISBN:9789004184350 (electronic bk.)
900418435X (electronic bk.)