Policing and punishment in London 1660-1750 : urban crime and the limits of terror /

Examines the considerable changes that took place in the criminal justice system in the city of London in the century after the Restoration, well before the inauguration of the so-called "age of reform." The policing institutions of the city were transformed in response to the problems cre...

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Main Author: Beattie, J. M. (Author)
Format: Book
Language:English
Published:Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2001.
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Main Author:Beattie, J. M.
Summary:Examines the considerable changes that took place in the criminal justice system in the city of London in the century after the Restoration, well before the inauguration of the so-called "age of reform." The policing institutions of the city were transformed in response to the problems created by the rapid expansion of the metropolis during the early modern period, and as a consequence of the emergence of a polite urban culture. The City authorities were instrumental in the establishment of new forms of punishment--particularly transportation to the American colonies and confinement at hard labor--that for the first time made secondary sanctions available to the English courts for convicted felons and diminished the reliance on the terror created by capital punishment.

This study examines the considerable changes that took place in the criminal justice system in the City of London in the century after the Restoration, well before the inauguration of the so-called 'age of reform'. The policing institutions of the City were transformed in response to theproblems created by the rapid expansion of the metropolis during the early modern period, and as a consequence of the emergence of a polite urban culture. At the same time, the City authorities were instrumental in the establishment of new forms of punishment - particularly transportation to theAmerican colonies and confinement at hard labour - that for the first time made secondary sanctions available to the English courts for convicted felons and diminished the reliance on the terror created by capital punishment. The book investigates why in the century after 1660 the elements of analternative means of dealing with crime in urban society were emerging in policing, in the practices and procedures of prosecution, and in the establishment of new forms of punishment.

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Physical Description:xix, 491 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 25 cm
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:0198208677 (acid-free paper)
019925723X (pbk.)
9780198208679
9780199257232
Author Notes:

J. M. Beattie is a Professor Emeritus of History at University of Toronto.

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