The book of martyrdom and artifice : first journals and poems, 1937-1952 /

"Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) kept a journal his entire life, beginning at the age of eleven. These first journals detail the inner thoughts of the awkward boy from Paterson, New Jersey, who would become the major poet and spokesperson of the literary phenomenon called the Beat Generation."

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Main Author: Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997. (Author)
Other Authors: Lieberman-Plimpton, Juanita.
Morgan, Bill, 1949-
Format: Book
Language:English
Published:Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, 2006.
Edition:1st Da Capo Press ed.
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Related Information:Contributor biographical information 
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Main Author:Ginsberg, Allen, 1926-1997.
Summary:"Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) kept a journal his entire life, beginning at the age of eleven. These first journals detail the inner thoughts of the awkward boy from Paterson, New Jersey, who would become the major poet and spokesperson of the literary phenomenon called the Beat Generation."
"The Book of Martyrdom and Artifice covers the most important and formative years of Ginsberg's storied life. During this time as a precocious and inquisitive student at Columbia College in New York City, he met Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs, both of whom would become lifelong friends and significant literary figures in their own right. Ginsberg's journals - so candid he insisted they be published only after his death - also document his complex relationships with other figures of Beat lore: Herbert Huncke, Lucien Carr, and Carl Solomon."
"Ginsberg transcribes from memory conversations with Kerouac, Neal Cassady, and many others. He divulges information related to Carr's infamous murder of David Kammerer. And he reveals a growing self-awareness about himself, his sexuality, and his identity as a poet. Illustrated with never-before-seen photographs from Ginsberg's archive and bolstered by an appendix of his earliest poems, The Book of Martyrdom and Artifice is a major literary event."--Jacket.

Allen Ginsberg (1926-1997) kept journals his entire life, beginning at the age of eleven. These first journals detail the inner thoughts of the awkward boy from Paterson, New Jersey, who would become the major poet and spokesperson of the literary phenomenon called the Beat Generation. The Book of Martyrdom and Artifice covers the most important and formative years of Ginsberg's storied life. It was during these years that he met Jack Kerouac and William S. Burroughs, both of whom would become lifelong friends and significant literary figures. Ginsberg's journals--so candid he insisted they be published only after his death--also document his relationships with such notable figures of Beat lore as Carl Solomon, Lucien Carr, and Herbert Huncke. Conversations with Kerouac, his beloved muse Neal Cassady, andothers have been transcribed from Ginsberg's memory, and information will be found here relating to the famous murder of David Kammerer by Carr--a startlingly violent chapter in Beat prehistory--which has been credited in New York magazine as "giving birth to the Beat Generation." It was also during this period that he began to recognize his homosexuality, and to think of himself as a poet. Illustrated with photos from Ginsberg's private archive and enhanced by an appendix of over 100 of Ginsberg's earliest poems, The Book of Martyrdom and Artifice is a major literary event.

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General Notes:Includes journals from Ginsberg's formative years that document his relationships with Carl Solomon, Lucien Carr, and Herbert Huncke, Ginsberg's conversations with Jack Kerouac, Neal Cassady, and others, an appendix of more than 100 of Ginsberg's earliest poems.
Physical Description:xviii, 523 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 25 cm
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:0306814625 (hardcover : alk. paper)
0306815621
9780306814624 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780306815621
Author Notes:

Irwin Allen Ginsberg was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of poet and teacher Louis Ginsberg. In 1948, he received a B.A. degree from Columbia University.

Ginsberg began writing poetry while still in school and first gained wide public recognition in 1956 with the long poem Howl. Howl has had a stormy history. When it was first recited at poetry readings, audiences cheered wildly. It was published by Lawrence Ferlinghetti's City Lights Books and printed in England. Before the printed copies could be distributed, however they were seized by U.S. custom officials as obscene. After a famous court case in which the poem was found not to be obscene, the work sold rapidly and Ginsberg's reputation was assured.

Regarded as the foremost port of the Beat generation (as group of rebellious writers who opposed conformity and sough intensity of experience), Ginsberg's work is concerned with many subjects of contemporary interest, including drugs, sexual confusion, the voluntary poverty of the artist and rebel, and rejection of society. He is a poet with a significant message, and his criticism of American society is part of a long tradition of American writers who have questioned their country's values.

Ginsberg received numerous honors, including a Woodbury Poetry Prize, a National Institute of Arts and Letters Award, and a National Book Award for poetry. Ginsberg was a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 1995 for his book Cosmopolitan Greetings: Poems 1986-1992. Ever the Bohemian, he had numerous occupations throughout his lifetime including dishwasher, porter, book reviewer, and spot welder. He died in April 1997 of complications due to liver cancer.

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