Averroes

Ibn Rushd was the preeminent philosopher in the history of [[Al-Andalus | native_name = | fullname = | birth_date = 1126 | birth_place = Córdoba, Al-Andalus, Almoravid emirate (in present-day Spain) | death_date = | death_place = Marrakesh, Maghreb, Almohad Caliphate (Morocco) | era = Medieval, Islamic Golden Age | region = Islamic philosophy | school_tradition = Aristotelianism (philosophy)
Intellectualism (theology)
Maliki (jurisprudence) | main_interests = Islamic theology, philosophy, Islamic jurisprudence, medicine, astronomy, physics, linguistics | influences = Aristotle, Plato, Al-Farabi, Avicenna, Al-Ghazali, Ibn Bajja | influenced = Maimonides, Samuel ibn Tibbon, Siger of Brabant, Boethius of Dacia, Thomas Aquinas, John of Jandun, Marsilius of Padua, Gaetano da Thiene, Pietro Pomponazzi, Agostino Nifo, Marcantonio Zimara. See also Averroism. | notable_ideas = Relation between Islam and philosophy, non-contradiction of reason and revelation, unity of the intellect }}

Ibn Rushd (}}; full name in ; 1126 – 11 December 1198), often Latinized as Averroes (English pronunciation: ), was a Muslim Andalusian philosopher and thinker who wrote about many subjects, including philosophy, theology, medicine, astronomy, physics, Islamic jurisprudence and law, and linguistics. His philosophical works include numerous commentaries on Aristotle, for which he was known in the West as ''The Commentator''. He also served as a judge and a court physician for the Almohad caliphate.

He was born in Córdoba in 1126 to a family of prominent judges—his grandfather was the chief judge of the city. In 1169 he was introduced to the caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf, who was impressed with his knowledge, became his patron and commissioned many of Averroes' commentaries. Averroes later served multiple terms as a judge in Seville and Córdoba. In 1182, he was appointed as court physician and the chief judge of Córdoba. After Abu Yusuf's death in 1184, he remained in royal favor until he fell into disgrace in 1195. He was targeted on various charges—likely for political reasons—and was exiled to nearby Lucena. He returned to royal favor shortly before his death on 11 December 1198.

Averroes was a strong proponent of Aristotelianism; he attempted to restore what he considered the original teachings of Aristotle and opposed the Neoplatonist tendencies of earlier Muslim thinkers, such as Al-Farabi and Avicenna. He also defended the pursuit of philosophy against criticism by Ashari theologians such as Al-Ghazali. Averroes argued that philosophy was permissible in Islam and even compulsory among certain elites. He also argued scriptural text should be interpreted allegorically if it appeared to contradict conclusions reached by reason and philosophy. His legacy in the Islamic world was modest for geographical and intellectual reasons.

In the West, Averroes was known for his extensive commentaries on Aristotle, many of which were translated into Latin and Hebrew. The translations of his work reawakened Western European interest in Aristotle and Greek thinkers, an area of study that had been widely abandoned after the fall of the Roman Empire. His thoughts generated controversies in Latin Christendom and triggered a philosophical movement called Averroism based on his writings. His unity of the intellect thesis, proposing that all humans share the same intellect, became one of the most well-known and controversial Averroist doctrines in the West. His works were condemned by the Catholic Church in 1270 and 1277. Although weakened by the condemnations and sustained critique by Thomas Aquinas, Latin Averroism continued to attract followers up to the sixteenth century. Provided by Wikipedia
3
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1953
...Averroës, 1126-1198. Commentarium magnum in Aristotelis De anima libros....
Book
4
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1967
(CARLI) (Other Sources: (CTUdb)28197)
Book
7
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1958
...Averroës, 1126-1198. Corpus commentariorum Averrois in Aristotelem. Versio Anglica,...
Book
8
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1966
Book
9
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1986
Book
10
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1969
(CARLI) (Other Sources: (DOMdb)124501, (SIEdb)364427)
Book
11
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1978
Book
12
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1959
Book
13
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1961
Book
14
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1969
...Averroës, 1126-1198. Corpus commentariorum in Aristotelem. Versio Hebraica,...
Book
15
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1974
Book
16
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 2002
(CARLI) (Other Sources: (DPUdb)556105, (LCCdb)126841)
Book
17
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1992
(CARLI) (Other Sources: (NBYdb)103861)
Book
18
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1998
...Averroës, 1126-1198. Talkhīṣ kitāb al-maqūlāt. English. Averroës' middle commentaries...
Book
19
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 2000
...Averroës, 1126-1198. Talkhīṣ Kitāb al-shiʻr. English. Averroes' Middle commentary on Aristotle...
(CARLI) (Other Sources: (EIUdb)535917, (KNXdb)191181)
Book
20
by Averroës, 1126-1198.
Published 1960
Book
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