The 2-hour/4-hour challenge

By 2008, the Government wants 85% of pupils to be doing at least two hours a week of high-quality Physical Education and Sport within school. By 2010, the ambition is for all children to be doing at least four hours a week. Of those, it's expected at least two should be within the curriculum an...

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Corporate Author: ITV Granada Anglia. (Producer)
Format: Movie Electronic
Language:English
Published:[England] : Teachers TV/UK Department of Education, 2007.
Series:Get physical ; 3.
Get physical ; 11.
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Online Access:Primary Access restricted to NIU Libraries
Online Access: Secondary Access restricted to NIU Libraries
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Summary:By 2008, the Government wants 85% of pupils to be doing at least two hours a week of high-quality Physical Education and Sport within school. By 2010, the ambition is for all children to be doing at least four hours a week. Of those, it's expected at least two should be within the curriculum and the rest in out-of-school hours or in the community and clubs. The Manor School in Mansfield, a specialist sports college, is addressing the challenge with a range of opportunities designed to involve all students. Some groups who would traditionally have low participation rates are specially targeted. Options include not only traditional team games, but also martial arts, boccia, trampolining, rocketball, yoga and street dance. The Manor School's approach doesn't just rely on diverse provision. It also ensures that high quality is maintained, and that leadership by students is used as a tool to increase participation.
Willow Brook Primary School in Keyworth, near Nottingham, has gone to great lengths to ensure that all pupils are offered a wide range of high-quality physical education and sport. It's already meeting the Government's target of providing two hours a week . The school ensures its youngest pupils develop basic skills that will enable them to be competent and confident sportsmen and women who will enjoy participating. It is also open to all sorts of new ideas that will enhance sporting opportunities for its pupils, from a dance club run by a Year 6 pupil to an indoor rowing club. External coaches, professional development and leadership schemes also contribute to the school's success, and the provision not just of quantity but quality in PE. The walking bus scheme at Clayton Brook Primary School in Lancashire isn't physical education in the strict sense, but it achieves some of the same outcomes, and the children clock up 2 1/2 miles of walking and 75 minutes of exercise each week.
Language Notes:This edition in English.
Physical Description:1 online resource (1 streaming video (28 min.)).
Restrictions:Access restricted to subscribing institutions.